Studies

  • AGRA MAP Report- 1
    25 May 2017

    The Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA) commissioned Dalberg Global Development Advisors to conduct an independent evaluation of the performance of the Market Access Program (MAP), one of the core AGRA programs funded through the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation and the Swedish government. The primary goal of MAP is to improve the livelihoods of smallholder farmers across Africa by directing investment and resources to grantee organizations in order to improve the market infrastructure of core food staples.

  • going-beyond-demos
    27 September 2016

    Norman Borlaug and his colleagues, when developing the Asian Green Revolution, did not have an organization behind them like the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA). Its founding 10 years ago was a smart thing to do. H. E. Kofi Annan sounded the call for a uniquely African Green Revolution on July 5, 2004, at a meeting of Heads of State in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Not long afterwards, AGRA was established. Given the complexity of the challenges involved, AGRA had to be invented from scratch because no such institution existed before.

  • an-assessment-of-agricultural-policy-and-regulatory-constraints-to-agribusiness-investment
    06 April 2016

    A key theme from the five country studies is that policy and regulatory changes will only take a country so far. The agribusiness investment climate is shaped by many other factors. These factors are critically important in agribusiness development and can overshadow agribusiness-specific policies and regulations, which when reformed may only relax relatively minor bottlenecks.

  • land-policies-and-their-implications-for-smallholder-agriculture-in-africa
    01 May 2015

    This report presents a review of national land and agricultural policies and policy formulation and implementation processes in Tanzania, Uganda, Ghana, Mali, Mozambique and Zambia - six out of the sixteen African countries in which AGRA is active. The review was undertaken during the months of June and July 2014 to facilitate provision of high quality policy support to AGRA program countries to develop and implement land policies that will strengthen property rights to enhance investments and innovations by farmers for improved agricultural productivity. The report presents lessons on good and bad practice of agricultural policy formulation and implementation in Africa and recommends strategies to inform the work of AGRA and its partner countries going forward.

  • an-assessment-of-agricultural-policy-and-regulatory-constraints-to-agribusiness-investment
    04 April 2014

    A key theme from the five country studies is that policy and regulatory changes will only take a country so far. The agribusiness investment climate is shaped by many other factors, which are noted in this report. These factors are critically important in agribusiness development and can overshadow agribusiness specific policies and regulations, which when reformed may only relax relatively minor bottlenecks. Deep-seated constraints to agribusiness development are discussed in the report.

  • investing-in-soil-cases-and-lessons-from-agras-soil-health-programme
    04 April 2014

    Soil is one of the most overlooked ingredients in farming and yet it exists right beneath farmers’ feet. Healthy, fertile soils are an imperative starting point for agro-based development. But Africa’s soils are among the most degraded in the world. And this degradation continues as a result of deforestation, overgrazing of grasslands, continuous deep ploughing and inappropriate use that leads to the “mining” and depletion of soil nutrients. Yet agriculture does not have to degrade soils. Good agriculture can, and should, restore nutrients, conserve water and prevent soil erosion. In this book, AGRA demonstrates its commitment to improving soil health by managing the nexus between soil and agriculture, creating solutions and moving beyond demonstrations to showcase success stories that can be scaled up. This book will deepen the debate on alleviating hunger and poverty across Africa. The focus is on the ground below our feet – which, after all, is the most important ingredient in agriculture.

  • establishing-the-status-of-postharvest-losses-and-storage-for-major-staple-crops-2014
    04 March 2014

    This is a report of the second phase of a study that was commissioned to establish the status of post-harvest losses and storage for eleven major staple crops in eleven African countries. The report focused on empirical, qualitative and primary investigation; analysing perceptions and evidence provided by farmers and other value chain actors on issues relating to post-harvest crop management. The results of the study indicated that there are considerable post-harvest losses in every crop in different agro-ecological zones. Joint planning and execution of work with extension agents can make an impact in reducing post-harvest losses. In most of the countries, not much has been done in post-harvest management activities, particularly for smallholder farmers.

  • do-all-roads-lead-to-market-learning-from-agras-market-access-programme
    04 April 2013

    Smoothly functioning food markets are vital for food security. They give smallholder farmers incentives to generate a surplus they can sell, and to invest in new production and postharvest management technologies. They also ensure that food reaches consumers in deficit areas. In so doing, they contribute to food security and higher incomes, the main goal of the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA). This book reviews achievements, challenges and reflections of AGRA’s Market Access Programme’s after four years of work. The work was based on the assumption that unorganized, unskilled farmers and weak small and medium enterprises find it difficult to earn profits from marketing produce. They need to have up-to-date market information, including prices to help them negotiate with buyers. Three products of this review are discussed in the book.

  • establishing-the-status-of-postharvest-losses-and-storage-for-major-staple-crops
    04 February 2013

    This is a report of the first phase of a two phase study that was carried out to establish the status of post-harvest losses and storage for major staple crops in eleven African countries. The specific research objectives of this study were; to review recent research/studies on post-harvest losses and storage encountered by small and medium size farmers along value chain of the selected crops in 11 countries; and to review existing knowledge gaps on post-harvest losses and storage methods used by farmers in production areas in the 11 countries for the selected crops.